MAORI & WATER OF LIFE

WaiOra (water of life) is purest form of water

Maori are one of the indigenous peoples of NZ/Aotearoa, and they inherited much tradition from their ancestors. Maori lived close to the land and water, with a wide perception and perspective about the nature of nature.

We also include more information about Maori views of the Waikato River and Waipa River on our web site page HERE.

Here is some brief background of maori views about Water:

 “LIFE CANNOT SURVIVE WITHOUT WATER (WAI). 

WATER (FROM THE SKY AS TEARS OF SKY FATHER - RANGINUI) IS THE SOURCE OF ALL LIFE AND THE WATER-WAYS CARRY THE LIFEBLOOD OF THE LAND (EARTH MOTHER - PAPATUANUKU). 

THE PHYSICAL AND SPIRITUAL SURVIVAL OF ALL THINGS IS DEPENDENT ON THE MAINTENANCE OF THE LIFE FORCE (MAURI), SPIRIT (WAIRUA), POWER (MANA), AND SACREDNESS (TAPU) OF WATER (WAI). 

WATER HAS DIFFERENT QUALITIES, AND THE CATEGORY OF THE BEST AND  PUREST FORM OF FRESH WATER IS CALLED THE 'WATER OF LIFE' ('WAI ORO').

THE WATER OF LIFE (WAI ORO) GIVES AND SUSTAINS LIFE AND CAN  REJUVENATE DAMAGED LIFE FORCE (MAURI) AND COUNTERACT EVIL. 

THESE PUREST FORMS OF WATERS (WAI ORO) WERE USED BY SOME ANCESTORS (TUPUNA) FOR CLEANSING AND SPIRITUAL HEALING. 

SACRED NATURALLY CLEAN AND PURE WI ORO ARE SAID TO BE HEALING WATERS USED BY TOHUNGA AROUND THE MOTU IN CEREMONIES.

PHYSICAL AND SPIRITUAL ARE INSEPARABLE, THEREBY THE HEALTH  OF THE WHOLE SYSTEM REFLECTS THE WELL BEING OF OUR WHOLE COMMUNITY."  

Here IS some BRIEF background OF A maori IWI view about a particular NZ water spring.

This is the spring in the north of the South island of NZ, near Takaka, called Pupu or Te Waikoropüpü. These maori feelings and words about this spring epitomise maori sentiment and belief about all of nature, in this case more specifically about spring water....expressing how we are all one, and we all come from the same source.

Te Waikoropüpü/Pupu Springs

"Kahurangi mai rä anö ki Awaroa te rohe o Manawhenua ki Möhua Ko Möhua te takiwä Ko Parapara te Maunga ariki Ko ngä Waitapu o Uruäo te awa tapu Ko Te Waikoropüpü te Puna waiora Ko Huriawa te kaitiaki taniwha o te Puna Waikoropüpü Ko Te Taitapu te moana 

Kahurangi to Awaroa are the iwi boundary markers for Manawhenua ki Möhua lands. Möhua is the district, Parapara is the sacred mountains, Ngä Waitapu o Uruäo is the sacred river, Te Waikoropüpü is the sacred spring, Huriawa is the protective guardian of Te Waikoropüpü Springs, Te Taitapu is the sea, 

Te Waikoropüpü Springs is a Wähi Tapu, (a sacred place) of great significance to us as the Manawhenua iwi. As Manawhenua, we are the uri (descendants) of Mäori chiefs, who assumed the Kaitiakitanga (guardianship) of this rohe, a role that will continue on to our future generations. Te Waikoropüpü provides our iwi with a spiritual and physical link to our tüpuna (ancestors). As a collective, we operate under a whakaruruhau (umbrella) entity called Manawhenua ki Möhua to ensure our taongatuku iho (treasures from our ancestors) is protected.

Te Waikoropüpü waiata

Waikoropüpü, Waikoropüpü Püpü ake te whenua Püpü ake ko ngä waiora Waikoropupu Ngä puna wai o Täkaka Ngä puna roimata wairua Waikoropüpü, Waikoropüpü

Bubbling waters from the throat of the spring Bubbling waters from the throat of the spring Forever bubbling from the land Forever bubbling for the health of the people and the spring waters The spring waters of Täkaka The tears of the spirit ancestors, Water bubbling from the throat of the spring Waters bubbling from the throat of the spring.

The Manawhenua role as Kaitiaki is to uphold the mana and maintain the wairua and the mauri of our taonga (treasure) and to ensure its integrity is  protected for  future generations. 

Käore ngä Matauranga, Käore ngä Aroha, Kua ngaro ngä Tangata.

If knowledge and love are lost, a community is lost forever

--- MANAWHENUA KI MOHUA -GURADIANS OF THE TE WAIKOROPUPU/PUPU SPRINGS

Here is some brief background of maori views about Waikato River.

Maori used this river for transport, for food, and in early days as a source of water. It also provided an identity link for tribes living nearby.

River Spirits

Māori tradition sometimes referred to  taniwha  (monsters) living in rivers. They could be guardians of a place, or upholders of customs and tribal prestige. A Tainui proverb runs:

‘Waikato taniwha rau: he piko, he taniwha; he piko, he taniwha.’

'Waikato, home of a hundred taniwha: on every bend a taniwha can be found'.

This refers to the powerful presence of chiefs along the Waikato River.

The name Waikato comes from the Māori language and translates as flowing water.

The Waikato River has spiritual meaning for various local Māori tribes, including the large Tainui, who regard it as a source of their mana, or pride. The widely-respected marae of Turangawaewae is close to its banks at Ngaruawahia.

For many years Tainui tribe have sought to re-establish their links to the river after the New Zealand Wars (see Invasion of Waikato) and the subsequent confiscations of the 1860s, and are continuing negotiations with the New Zealand government. The Tainui iwi was advised not to bring a case for the river before the Waitangi Tribunal as they would not win.

An out of court settlement was arranged and the deed of settlement signed by the Crown and Waikato-Tainui in August 2008 settled the raupatu claim to the Waikato River, although other claims for land blocks and harbours are still outstanding. Waikato-Tainui now have joint management of the river with Environment Waikato.

In recent times both the Waikato Regional Council and Tainui have been jointly attempting to clean-up parts of the Waikato River, and positive actions have been initiated by them for this purpose.

FOR some brief background of maori & Waitaha views about our Heartland Springs refer to this web site page here

 

INFORMATION WHICH FOLLOWS IS FROM THE NZ MINISTRY OF HEALTH 2004.

Article called Maori health The Challenge ---  by Ria Earp MA MBA, Deputy Director-General, Maori Health, and Don Matheson MBChB MCCM(NZ) FAFPHM(RACP), Deputy Director-General, Public Health

"Whanau ora (excellent family life-health) encompasses certain ‘non-health’ elements that Maori consider the essentials of life.

These are usually detailed as food, water, warmth, companionship or love and social existence.

Individually and together, these are also fundamental to disease prevention in Maori. Many of these concepts are being integrated into initiatives already underway. A revolution is under way in the approach to food by maori.

Water

Recognising another critical public health issue, the Ministry of Health has a significant programme promoting the safety of drinking water.

This includes an annual report on the microbiological and chemical quality of supplies, information on how to ensure supplies, such as rainwater supplies, are safe and revision of the Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand. One innovative approach has been in the Hokianga where the Ministry of Health has funded water treatment plants for the community through the local marae. 

“ See the hawk soar above the mountains,
Calling follow me up high.

Do not search for me in this world.
Seek within your heart for me.

Pick up a pebble from the midstream.
Hold it to your ear and dream.

It will tell you tales of wonder
Of love-filled days that might have been.”
— Part of 'Song of Waitaha'